Frankly Blogging 102: Writing to Engage Your Readers

You’ve done it. You’ve finally made your blog. You’ve picked a name. You’ve filled out your information. You’ve followed every step in Frankly Blogging 101: Creating Your First Successful Blog.

Now you can write whatever you want, right? Wrong!

You need to start planning what you will post, how you’ll post it, and how it will interact with your blog’s potential audience. Only when these things come together will you be able to make that terrific blog that earns you plenty of visitors and a sufficient amount of passive income each day.

Let’s take a look at everything you ever needed to know to write amazing blog posts.

Step One: Starting With an Idea

The first logical step that I pursue when I begin crafting a new blog post is to start with an idea. I’ll start with something broad, then slowly define where I want to go.

For example, consider this post. I’m creating a definitive how-to series on blogging that will slowly expand into something more. When I finish it, and I use that term incredibly loosely, I’ll begin writing small posts that offer tips for blogging alongside some answers to questions I receive.

This enables me to make helpful content that my readers will find useful for some time to come. This is a win-win situation for both myself, the blogger, and you, the reader.

Step Two: Introductions

I don’t just jump into a post. I sit around and let the idea I want to pursue ferment like fine wine.

This post, for example, started a few weeks ago. I’ve been thinking about it for days, though I haven’t done so actively. I’ve thought about how I want to start it out, how I want to format it, and how I want to logically proceed through it with you.

These things all need to be nailed down before I can write my introduction, as they help me decide how to introduce the topic to you in a way that compels you to read more.

When you finish your introduction, perform the following quick checks:

  • Does it grab your attention from the first sentence?
  • What does it say that your post is about?
  • Does it state what your reader will get from reading your post?
  • How “Above the Fold” is it?
  • Would you keep reading?

If you can’t answer these questions, then keep rewriting your introduction until it’s compelling. It’s the part of your post that helps you really get your foot in the door, so making it superb is something you need to do.

Step Three: Start Writing

You’ve put everything together. Your proverbial ducks are now in the neatest of lackadaisical rows.

What do you do now?

Easy! You start writing.

Start with your most important logical point first, then progress until you reach the end.

Take this post as an example of that. I introduced a problem, which is the difficulty in writing a compelling blog post. I then began to list step by step how to conquer blog posts until you’re able to write something compelling.

I follow this same process in every blog post I make. I write an introduction, which I can use as a prompt, then I began to logically answer the problem or address the situation. Your posts need to have a similar composition if you want to connect with readers whom have problems.

When you’re writing, ensure that you take the time to make your content scannable. You want to make it easy for readers to skim through your content to acquire a quick overview of what your content is about before reading every nitty gritty detail.

One thing I would suggest is to take a look at these proven formulas for successful content. They’re the kind of things that your readers will love to read.

Step Five: The Conclusion and Your Title

I know that it doesn’t make much sense at first, but I wait until I’ve finished my blog posts before I go back to write a conclusion and a title.

I write the conclusion last, as it allows me to reiterate any important points I may have merely touched upon in my writing. This part is logical. It’s tying the bow that wraps up the creative process in a neat way that allows my readers to know exactly what they’re taking away from my posts.

The title is similar. I find it significantly easier to create an engaging blog title when I wait until the end, as I know both what my post is about and what should make others read it.

Step Four: Enriching Your Content

You’ve written an astounding post, but you’re nowhere near done yet. Now you need to go over your posts to minor out any flaws and to enrich your content.

When I revise my content, the first thing I do is to look for grammatical or spelling errors. While I try to do this in the process of writing, sometimes my posts can take several hours to compose. This leaves them prone to the occasional error.

The next step is to re-read your content for the proper flow. You want your readers to be able to take small bites of your content at a pace that they can set.

The last step is to enrich your content. You need to add images, format your post and make things amazing. Consider this step the part where you put the cherry on top of the whipped cream.

What’s Next to Making Your Blog Successful?

In this post, we’ve covered a good chunk of what you need to know to write amazing blog posts. You’re going to want to practice doing this over and over again, until you’re able to make masterful posts that your readers naturally want to read.

Remember that a good blog starts with amazing content.

The next step in my Blogging Series will teach you how to promote your blog. We’re going to look at social media, bookmarking, guest blogs and a number of promotional vehicles that you absolutely must use if you plan to create a successful blog.

What content writing tips do you have for other bloggers? What challenges have you encountered when creating blog posts of your own?

Share, discuss and ask questions below. You’ll help other readers facing similar problems while finding answers that will help make your blogs even better.

 

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Frankly Blogging 101: Your Guide to Starting Your First Successful Blog for 2016

Creating a bustling enterprise from scratch is one of the most common dreams alive. You, me and every person within whom the entreprenurial spirit’s flame burns inside wants to create this something from nothing.

Blogging is hands down the best way to do that.

The problem is that starting your own blog from scratch is more than just a simple challenge. It’s a momentous task, – I would know from personal experience.

That’s why I’ve decided to start a brand new section to my blog with a comprehensive guide to blogging. I’ll try to maintain some sense of order and cohesion by grouping every tip, trick and strategy I know about blogging into this series of post.

This post is Frankly Blogging 101: A Guide to Blogging in 2015. You’re going to learn about setting up your first blog, explore your options for setting it up, and discover how to erect the foundation of building a strong blog that people actually want to read.

 

1. What Kind of Blog do You Want?

There’s two major types of blogs: the kind you host and the kind that someone else hosts for you. The choice between the two is something that you’ll want to make before you even start dreaming about what kind of blog you want to run.

Self-Hosted Blogs

Self-hosted blogs utilize things like WordPress, b2evolution and Ghost. You’re given complete freedom in the type of plugins and themes you install on these platforms and how you use them, but you’re responsible for hosting, backing up your content and ensuring that your blogs stay updated.

If you plan to run a blog in conjunction with a business website or as your primary means of income (at a later date), then you should likely choose this option.

If you don’t yet have hosting, then I highly recommend that you go with HostGator. They regularly have deals, such as $1 for the first month’s hosting, that are extremely advantageous to the thrifty business or individual. They also have an amazing support system that has yet to fail me, even when I’ve had to contact them for technical questions.

Hosted Blogs

WordPress.com and Blogger are two examples of hosted blogging platforms. What you can use on these platforms and even what you say must fall within the policies dictated by the hosts, but this is the option you will want to go with if you don’t have the time or expertise to run your own blog.

Do keep in mind that you will pay down the road if your blog ever becomes a successful hit. Domains, extreme storage and custom themes tend to cost a pretty penny, which means that it’s definitely worth learning how to manage your own blog now rather than having someone else do it for you later.

A Quick Cost Comparison: Self-Hosted Versus Hosted

Self-hosted blogs are incredibly cheap to run int he beginning. You can pay around $5 to $10 for a top-level domain and $5 to $10 per month for the actual hosting. You don’t (and probably shouldn’t) pay any more than that until your blog becomes a bustling hit.

Hosted blogs require quite a bit more. While are free to begin with, they’re also minimal versions of what you could have. Domains can cost $20 to $30 per year in addition to the actual cost of a domain, extra storage can cost $10 to $50 and “premium” themes can cost $50 to $200 or more.

My recommendation is to go with a self-hosted blog. Again, HostGator is my recommendation for hosting.

2. What Do You Want to Blog About?

Once you have the logistics out of the way, the next step is to decide what you want to write about. This is the one step that can change over time, but you should generally try to stick with the topics you choose.

Here’s what you don’t want to do when you’re choosing a blog topic:

  • Don’t pick a subject because it seems profitable or just because other people are writing about it.
  • Avoid topics that you intensely care about, but few other people are interested in reading about. The rights of marsupials in kitchens, for example, is something that you should probably avoid.
  • Don’t choose something that seems boring to you. You’ll burn yourself out quickly and your blog readers will see right through your posts.
  • Refrain from jumping around multiple topics. Related ideas are fine on occasion, but big shifts are generally bad ideas.

Pick Your Topic

For your first blog, you want to choose something that you enjoy writing about. You want to choose something that you can create a unique viewpoint on. You want to pick a topic that other people will love to read about.

Take my blog as an example. I love entrepreneurship. I enjoy business. Internet marketing is my thing. I find social media and such fascinating. I love helping others.

So, I made Frankly Making Money. I wanted to offer a unique and trustworthy viewpoint that few other Internet marketers wanted to reveal.

It’s as simple as choosing something you love to write about. You’ll never go wrong when you do that.

What Happens If You Can’t Come Up With a Topic?

There’s going to be times when you can’t come up with an idea that generates traffic. You may flounder about while trying to reach the perfect theme for your blog.

That’s okay.

If you’re in that stage, then you might just keep trying things until they work. Some of the best blogs on the Internet were originally personal blogs filled with poetry and feelings about politics that slowly grew into realizations about life and business.

When you pick an idea, just make sure to stick with it. Give it three months before you jump to a new idea.

If you find yourself lacking enthusiasm or visitors at the end of those three months, then try something new. You’ll eventually hit your mark.

3. How Do You Set Up Your First Successful Blog?

When you start your first blog, here are the five things you need to address before you begin writing your first post:

  1. Your Blog’s Name – This may be linked to your blog’s address, so you should definitely come up with something.
  2. Keywords – These can change over time, but you should have some keywords to describe your blog. You’ll want these when you craft your first few posts and decide upon things like your blog’s motto.
  3. An About Page – Every blog needs an “About” page. You can write about your blog, your company or yourself. This allows readers to connect with you.
  4. Privacy Policies – While creating this is beyond the scope of this post, you will need a privacy policy. You can use Google to find some templates that will suffice.
  5. Affiliate Disclosures – The FTC now requires websites to have affiliate disclosures where appropriate. If you don’t plan to monetize your blog, then you won’t need to worry about this.

4. Your First Post

Now that you have everything else in order, it’s time to finally craft your first post. It doesn’t have to be anything groundbreaking, and I honestly don’t think it should be. It should be something to let people know what to expect from your blog.

“Hello, World!” posts are ideal for this. You can brainstorm topics while working on your blogging persona.

If you have keywords, make sure to use one or two of them here. Don’t focus on keyword stuffing, but do use them where they’re appropriate.

What Comes Next

In Blogging 102, we’ll cover how to begin working on your first few posts. We’ll also briefly touch upon a few tools that you might want to use while trying to build your blog from the ground up in the year 2015 and onward.

Interested in learning more about blogging? Take a look at my Learn About Blogging page!

Crafting the PERFECT Blog Posting Plan for 2016

It’s been a while since I’ve started Frankly Making Money. I’ve actually learned a lot in the process, especially when it comes to the interactions I’ve had with you, my dear readers.

One of the most important things I’ve learned pertains to creating a blogging schedule. I feel I touched upon this in my post about Running Your Blog With Just 12 Hours a Week, but now I really want to explore the topic of creating a comprehensive blogging agenda for 2015.

I’m going to explain what my plan is, and how you can create your own successful blogging plan without too much effort.

 

1. Commit to a Frequency

Consistency is something that’s required for blogs. You need to (try to) post at a set frequency, that way your readers know to keep coming back to you for updates.

Crafting the Perfect Blogging Plan

Crafting the Perfect Blogging Plan

If you’re hosting your own blog, you might want to very carefully consider a few things to decide upon what frequency you should blog.

A business that focuses on something like plumbing may only need four or five blog posts a month to cover seasonal issues and some rudimentary explanations about topics like drains and sewer replacement.

A blog run by a business in a fast-paced field like information technology may want to post 4-5 blog posts a day. This will enable them to keep up with the latest changes in technology while drawing in more readers from search engines as they become an authority source.

Ultimately, it only matters that you pick a blogging frequency that fits your blog and that you stick to it.

 

2. Dedicate Time to Researching

Research is something that I feel a lot of articles pertaining to blog planning in 2015 fail to address correctly. They only skim over it and say that you should be accurate on the information you provide your readers, but I feel like this is inadequate.

You should always dedicate time to research, as this allows you to include the most updated information available about your given blog topic.

In doing so, you’ll be doing an amazing service to your readers by providing them with information that may be hard to find elsewhere. Do this enough, and your blog may even get picked up by sources like Google News, which could be an amazing boost in both traffic and readership for your blog.

 

3. Pick Your Topics

Knowing what to talk about has been key to drive traffic to my blog. It’s not just about picking topics that I’ve found relate to the main theme of my blog, but those that reinforce other posts I’ve written and current events that are related to those topics.

For example, I recently covered the Google Panda 4.0 Update. This coincided with the previous SEO-related posts I’ve written about, which made it possible for me to interlink them within the post.

Inspirational Quotes About Proving Yourself

I’ve done similar with my posts about Facebook marketing and everything else.

You should try to replicate this.

For example, say you have a blog about something like vacuum cleaners. You could expand what you talk about in your blog to posts about keeping your home clean, reducing the dust in your house and even the benefits of having an efficient vacuum cleaner.

Knowing what topics to write about comes down to knowing what your audience wants to read the most. If you’re just developing a following, then it should be topics that bring the type of readers you want to have in to you.

 

4. Take Some Time to Beautify Your Posts

Blogging isn’t just about getting information out there, – it’s about ensuring that your readers stay hooked on your every word.Marketing that Stops Working Puts You in Trouble

A wall of text will likely leave them confused and uninterested in what you have to say. That’s why it’s important to take the time to beautify your posts with images, infographics, videos and everything else that you can find.

Having the right multimedia to support your posts should be a part of your planning process.

 

5. Craft Intriguing Headlines

While it’s a relatively minor nuance compared to having amazing content, creating the right title will draw in the right audience.

This is especially true when it comes to publishing your blog on social networks, social bookmarking sites or even just things like the WordPress.com Reader. Your title will be the thing that gives your readers a thousand words about your post before they even take the time to read it.

If you’re struggling with headlines, then I recommend that you take a look over at my two-part post about them. Start with Blog Titles: Part One.

 

6. Take the Time to Respond to Your Community

The amount of research and effort you put into your posts should be the hallmark of just how important quality posts are, but you’re still missing one very important part of the blog equation: your readers.

You-Need-Certain-Qualities-to-Make-Your-Own-Business-SuccessfulIt’s important to schedule some time into your blog planning to respond to your readers and to foster a sense of community. This is the only way to create a readership that will repeatedly come back to your blog to enjoy the things that you have to say.

In your planning, you should check at least once or twice a week, if not daily, for new comments to your posts. You want to take the time to address any questions and concerns your readers have about your information while responding to any compliments that you might receive.

 

Building the Perfect Blog Posting Agenda for 2015

I’ve laid out all the steps that I take when I work on this blog in an attempt to help you do better with your own. My advice applies to personal blogs and business blogs, so make sure to take it all to heart

Is there something else special that you do when you create your blog plans? Let me hear about them in the comments!

The Most Comprehensive List of Web 2.0 Sites Ever Created (2016)

Most Comprehensive Web 2.0 List Ever Made

Web 2.0 sites are in high demand. They make for excellent properties that you can use as a basis for everything from content marketing to off-site SEO.

The main problem that businesses and individuals have when it comes to Web 2.0 sites is deciding which ones to use. Contrary to what most people will want you to believe, the PageRank has a minimal impact upon how effective they are.

In this post, I’m going to go through a comprehensive list of the 46 most popular Web 2.0 sites. While I’ll arrange these by PageRank, I will add a separate portion that rates how useful these Web 2.0 sites are and give a recommendation as to how you should use them.

 

What Can You Use Web 2.0 Sites For?

There’s a lot of things that you can use Web 2.0 sites for. Below is just a short list of the things that they can do:

  • They rank highly on their own. This means that you can use them to squeeze out your competition for low to medium competition searches.
  • They convey a sizable chunk of domain authority. That makes them useful for SEO purposes. You can further increase the domain authority by being an active participant on some of these Web 2.0 sites.
  • They can generate traffic on their own. Some, but not all, of these Web 2.0 sites can generate traffic on their own through internal mechanisms. For example, Hubpages has things like related hubs that can drive traffic to your pages from other related pages that you may not own.

The List of the Best Web 2.0 Sites

Without further ado, let’s take a look at the most comprehensive list of Web 2.0 sites available on the Internet.

Let’s start off with addressing the top 20 Web 2.0 sites you want to use with a quick analysis of each.

 

1. WordPress.com – PR 9

WordPress.com is a blogging platform that makes it easy to use WordPress without having your own website. Things like the WordPress Readers, comments and the ability for registered and unregistered users to follow your blog make it a versatile Web 2.0 website.

What you need to watch out for is that you can only promote your own products on a WordPress.com blog. Your blog can be terminated at a moment’s notice if you spam backlinks to it or violate any of the WordPress.com terms of service.

Rating: 9.0/10
Suggested Use: Multi-purpose with a focus on traffic generation.

 

2. Blogger.com – PR 8

Blogger is a Web 2.0 site run by Google. This means that it has the unique ability to integrate with your Google+ profile, which you may find more useful if you’ve done work on it. Pages and posts published on Blogger tend to be indexed quickly and tend to rank above average in search engines with little or no extra off-page SEO.

The one downside about Blogger is that it seems to be made more for SEO than for anything else. You can use it as a secondary blog for your main site, but I would only recommend this is you have an excess of content to post here.

Rating: 8.5/10
Suggested Use: Off-site SEO or Blogging

 

3.LiveJournal – PR 8

LiveJournal is a relatively unique Web 2.0 site. While it has a high PageRank, it has a relatively low value for businesses and Internet marketers looking to complement their existing digital presence. Live Journal pages not only tend to rank low, but they tend to draw minimal traffic (save for certain special cases) and tend to look poorly.

Rating: 7.5/10
Suggested Use: Strictly SEO

 

4. Tumblr – PR 8

Tumblr stands as a stark contrast to the previous Web 2.0 site. Not only does it have a superb traffic generation ability, but it also tends to pass domain authority fairly well.

The one caveat is that Tumblr needs an active hand for you to see consistent results from it.

Rating: 8.5/10
Suggested Use: Content and Social Media Marketing

 

5. TypePad – PR 8

TypePad, for all intents and purposes, is more similar to WordPress.com than anything else. You have a feature similar to the WordPress reader and the chance to be featured on the front page of the website.

The only thing that I’ve noticed about TypePad that isn’t’ so spectacular is how it passes domain authority. It seems both hard to collect authority from TypePad through commenting and cross-posting and like TypePad doesn’t want to pass that authority off-site so well.

Rating 7.5/10
Suggested Used: Content Marketing and Blogging

 

6. Weebly – PR 8

Weebly is one of my personal favorites to use when building off-site web properties. Not only do Weebly sites tend to rank fairly well on their own, but they pass link juice and tend to respond well to multi-tier link building strategies.

The only downside is that Weebly tends to not generate traffic on its own like the other Web 2.0 sites listed here.

Rating: 9.0/10
Suggested Use: Secondary Websites, Content Marketing and SEO

 

7. My.Opera.com – PR 8

My.Opera.com used to be a fairly lucrative Web 2.0 property website to use. It provided a way to organically attract visitors while creating pages that ranked fairly well in search results.

However, this Web 2.0 property has been closed since March 3rd, 2014.

Rating: N/A
Suggested Use: None, as it’s closed.

 

8. Squidoo – PR 7

Squidoo is another Web 2.0 site that will work to naturally produce traffic on its own from internal sources. Related pages will drive visitors to both your Squidoo lenses and your links.

The one thing to watch out for is that there are certain stipulations about what sites you can link to on your lenses and how often.

Rating: 8.5/10
Suggested Use: SEO and Content Marketing

Squidoo’s registration is currently closed after HubPages acquired it. Avoid until further notice.

 

9. Tripod – PR 7

Tripod has been around since times ancient as far as the Internet is concerned. It’s still a valid place to build a mini-site, but you may want to do so only if you have to.

The simple reason is that Tripod contains a lot of ads and passes on little SEO value due to the numerous outbound links that tend to be sponsored by Tripod.

Rating: 5.0/10
Suggested Use: Avoid unless you need another property

 

10. Bravenet – PR 7

Bravenet has come a long way since its more humble beginnings. It’s now a fully-fledged website builder that’s capable of making decent-looking websites on the fly.

The downside is that unlike many of the other Web 2.0 sites listed here, there’s little in the way of traffic generation. This means that you’re on your own if you plan to use it for anything more than SEO.

Rating: 8.0/10
Suggested Use: SEO or Mini-Site Building

 

11. Multiply – PR 7

Multiply used to be my preferred Web 2.0 site to use over options like Jimbdo and Weebly, but it has since closed down. It had a decent amount of mechanics that made traffic generation easy.

Rating: N/A
Suggested Use: None, Multiply has closed.

 

12. Webs.com – PR 7

Webs, formerly known as “Freewebs”, is a step or two above Tripod in terms of website creation. You’re given a number of nifty utilities such as a guest book and gallery.

The downside with Webs is that any domain authority that would get transferred to your links tends to bleed out through the numerous advertisements shown on the pages. These advertisements make it hard to use Webs as a mini-site.

Rating: 6.0/10
Suggested Use: Secondary Property for SEO

 

13. Jimbdo – PR 7

I personally like Jimbdo for the numerous features you gain access to without paying. You’ve got a great website builder that can work to create a decent mini-site for your business.

As far as setbacks go, Jimdo has very few. You still have links in the footer to Jimdo’s main page and a handful of ads. You also don’t have any type of natural traffic generation on Jimdo unless you pay for it.

Rating: 8.5/10
Suggested Use: Multi-Purpose

 

14. Wikispaces – PR 7

Wikispaces is probably the best place to create your own Wiki. The only catch is that it should be a wiki geared towards education. You can probably red between the lines here to see what that would be.

With that being said, spammy wikis tend to be deleted on a regular basis.

Rating: 7.5/10
Suggested Use: Content Marketing

 

15. Xanga – PR 7

Xanga is a social networking websites that has been around since the days of MySpace. The only caveat is that, unlike MySpace, they have evolved their website to be more of a blogging platform combined with the features that Live Journal provides.

The only drawback to using Xanga is that it’s not a solution for businesses. It’s best to take the “personal blog” approach if you plan to do so, as it will make your efforts go further.

Rating: 8.0/10
Suggested Use: Blogging or SEO

 

16. Yola – PR 7

Yola makes for a decent Web 2.0 property. While there’s no internal flow of traffic like there are on other websites and you’re fairly limited unless you pay a regular subscription, Yola’s still worthwhile when it comes to SEO uses.

Without paying, you get access to 1GB of bandwidth, 1GB of storage and 3 pages for your Web 2.0 site. This is why I recommend it for SEO rather than anything else.

Rating: 8.5/10
Suggested Use: SEO

 

17. Quizilla – PR 7

Quizilla is another website like Live Journal It’s not suited for making anything professional on it unless your audience coincides with that of the teenage audience that tends to use Quizilla.

With that being said, you can still use Quizilla for link-building purposes.

Rating: 7.5/10
Suggested Use: SEO or Content Marketing in Special Cases

18. Gather – PR 6

Gather is something closer to an article website than anything else, but it still qualifies as a Web 2.0 site. You can dress up your author profile page akin to one, which makes it useful for businesses.

As far as drawbacks go, there are few. You have traffic generation and pages that will have a decent chance to rank in search engines on their own for low to medium competition keywords.

Rating: 8.0/10
Suggested Use: Content Marketing with SEO Secondary

 

19. Hubpages – PR 6

Hubpages is one of my favorite Web 2.0 sites to use, but not because there’s any outstanding link building benefits to it. It’s the fact that you can leverage it to paint yourself as an authority among like-minded individuals, which in turn can allow you to draw more traffic than you ever would have thought possible.

The main problem I have with Hubpages is that your fellow authors tend to be rather cut-throat. This may be a side effect of Hubpage’s popularity to be used as a “Post and Dump” place for blackhat link building schemes, or it may just be due to the competitive nature Hubpages tends to foster. Be careful of what you post here.

Rating: 8.0/10
Suggested Use: Content Marketing and Targeting Low-Competition Searches

 

20. Blog.co.uk – PR 6

Blog.co.uk is yet another blogging website. You get all the standard blogging features with a little bit of internal traffic being driven your way.

The reason that Blog.co.uk doesn’t rate higher with me stems from the fact that it tends to be highly prone to prolonged periods of downtime. This can make it problematic, which is why I recommend that you use it purely for SEO purposes.

Rating: 6.5/10
Suggested Use: SEO with a Touch of Content Marketing

 

But What About the Other Web 2.0 Websites?

No list of Web 2.0 websites could call itself comprehensive without listing the other Web 2.0 sites out there. Just keep in mind that many of these websites are transient, – which means that they may be here today but gone tomorrow.

For everything listed below here, I recommend that you use these are tertiary or further websites if you’re dealing with tiered link building. Don’t invest too much in these Web 2.0 sites since you have better alternatives available to you.

 

The List of Every Other Web 2.0 Site

  1. Blog.com – PR 6
  2. Diaryland.com – PR 6
  3. Blogspirit.com – PR 6
  4. Zimbio – PR 6
  5. SOSBlog.com – PR 6
  6. Gather.com – PR 6
  7. Weblogs.uk – PR 5
  8. Blogdrive.com – PR 5
  9. Thoughts.com – PR 5
  10. Blogtext.org – PR 5
  11. InsaneJournal – PR 5
  12. TBlog – PR 4
  13. 20Six.co.uk – PR 4
  14. Blog.ca – PR 4
  15. BlogSkinny.com – PR 4
  16. Blurty – PR 4
  17. Free-Conversant.com – PR 4
  18. FreeFlux.net – PR 4
  19. Blog.com – PR 4
  20. BlogHi.com – PR 4
  21. BlogStudio.com – PR 4
  22. WikyBlog.com – PR 3
  23. Blogigo – PR 3
  24. JournalFen – PR 3

 

Which of these sites is your favorite to use? What purpose do you use it for? Did I miss your favorite Web 2.0 website? Did you just appreciate the list?

Leave a comment below!